New York City or the “Big Apple” is the financial capital of the world—the city that never sleeps. Walk down the streets of Broadway, and you can hear someone humming the tune “New York, New York” immortalized by Liza Minnelli and Frank Sinatra. With access to Central Park, I believe a more appropriate label for New York City is the “Garden of Eden.” The trees in this Garden sustain life, support knowledge, and generate forbidden fruits. One serpentine bite of the forbidden apple and we are at the cross roads with Genesis!

Why was New York City baptized as the “Big Apple?”

Big Apple

In the early 1920s, “Big Apple” was a nickname for large monetary awards associated with horse racing contests, many of which were organized in and around New York City. The name was commercialized by prominent writers from the New York Morning Telegraph reporting on the City’s horse-racing. Because the city hosted important races, rewards associated with the races were substantial, which may explain the term Big Apple.

Big Apple was subsequently adopted by the City’s jazz musicians. An old saying in show business was “there are many apples on the tree, but only one Big Apple.” New York City being the premier place for jazz musicians to perform made it customary to designate New York City as the Big Apple.

The City in 1971 started a campaign to increase tourism and officially adopted the nickname Big Apple. The campaign featured red apples as reminder of the bright and cheery side of the City, in stark contrast to the common belief that New York City was dark and dangerous. Since then, New York City has officially been designated as the Big Apple.

Jobs’ Apple

What if a bite of the Big Apple eludes you? There is a solution to this biblical dilemma—own a piece of Steve Jobs’ Apple. Apple Inc. designs and manufactures computer hardware, software and other consumer electronics. The company is best known for its Macintosh personal computer line, iTunes media application, the iPod personal music player, and the iPhone.

The original logo of the company, which portrays a man sitting under an apple tree, draws on the Newtonian inspiration from a falling apple. Subsequently, Apple redesigned its logo depicting a bite of an apple. I believe the bite taken out of the Apple represents the story of Adam and Eve from the Garden of Eden with apple representing knowledge.

  • Holy Cash Cow

The company today is a colossal holy cash-cow. Based on data from the most recent financial statements, i.e., April 2017, the company has a cash balance including short term marketable securities of around $67 billion. If you add long-term marketable securities, the balance increases to nearly $260 billion, which is larger than the GDP of Greece!

What is the genesis of the cash balance? iSimple, high margins. The company’s gross profit margin is around 40%, which means for every $1 of sales, the company generates 40 cents of profit after deducting the cost of sales. The operating margins are equally staggeringly high (around 27%). Even after netting out all operating costs, the company generates $27 of profits for every $100 of sales. The sales for the first quarter of 2017 alone was $52 billion, a mind- blowing number.

  • Investments and Acquisitions

Apple is all about organic growth. The company is very frugal with its investments and acquisitions. Much of the excess cash is heavily invested in marketable securities (parking the cash and generating returns on those dollars). Its corporate investments, i.e, purchase of other companies or fixed assets, is rather modest at less than 5% of total assets.

  • Giving Back

What does the company do with its surplus cash balance? It pays dividend and buys back its own stock. Over the 6-months period ending April 2017, the company paid $6 billion as dividend. Over the same period, it repurchased $18 billion of its common stock. Thus, the cash returned to its shareholders was around $24 billion over a period of six months only.

No wonder shareholders are elated and appear flying on Elon Musk’s spaceship to the red planet. Over just under a year, the stock price of the company has increased from around $93 to $155, which translates into a 67% annual return. No legal business in the world can come close to generating these holy numbers.

If you cannot get a bite of the Big Apple, I suggest you consider a bite of the Apple company. Apple’s history is being cooked with a hint of exotic spices by its own “Cook.” The taste is simply divine.

Bon Appétit!

May 16, 2017

 
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